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New Walmart Development Proposed For East Northbrook

A 15 acre lot on Skokie Blvd., near the highway, could hold a 24 hour supercenter if the Village of Northbrook approves Walmart's request to rezone the space and develop a new store.

More than 100 people turned out for the Northbrook Village Board meeting Tuesday night. At one point during the meeting, trustee James Karagianis asked the audience who arrived to hear the Walmart proposal portion of the meeting and practically everyone raised their hand. 

Representatives from Walmart and village staff described the company's proposed 24 hour supercenter at 1000 Skokie Blvd. for almost 90 minutes at Tuesday's board meeting. 

Walmart's proposal at the board meeting was not an indicator of the village's support or opposition to the store's presence in Northbrook — at the meeting's start, Steve Elrod, the village attorney, said the village was legally obligated to consider any zoning change proposal, and a zoning change on the lot would be necessary for the development to proceed. 

According to village staff, the 18 acre lot south of Dundee Rd. is currently zoned for office space, but would have to be rezoned for to make way for a commercial development. Walmart proposes a store that would occupy 15acres, but the developer wants to rezone the entire property with the potential for future commercial development on the leftover land. 

If Walmart decides to proceed with their application process, their proposal would need to be considered by the village's plan and zoning commissions.

The proposed Walmart development could bring general merchandise, groceries and a pharmacy to the North Shore, along with 6,000 cars in estimated daily traffic, 25 weekly trucks and a 30 foot high sign, according to representatives from the company. 

The development would not include a gas station, drive-through pharmacy or tire center, Walmarts reps said. Other discussed features were exterior lighting designed to avoid spillage into nearby residential areas, partially constructing the building with recycled material and a 300 square foot sign outside the proposed store.

Trustee Kathryn Ciesla asked the Walmart reps whether the store would sell alcohol or firearms. The representative said they would seek a liquor license for their grocery sales, but Village President Sandy Frum said they can not sell firearms. 

"That does not meet our code whatsoever," Frum said, regarding firearm sales. 

Representatives from the Northbrook East Homeowners Association spoke out against the proposal, warning the board members of the potential traffic congestion, pollution, and decreased property value that could occur because of the big box retailer nearby. 

Trustee Michael Scolaro asked how much revenue the company expects the store to make, but representatives would not disclose that specific number. Instead, Scolaro asked how many stores the company had and their annual earnings, and used those responses to estimate the store could bring $1 - 2 million in revenue for the village. 

The company's representatives said the store could bring in about 300 to 350 jobs to Northrook. 

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Harry Gio December 12, 2012 at 03:50 PM
IT'S ALL ABOUT THE BIG TAX DOLLARS THAT THE VILLAGE OF NORTHBROOK CAN MAKE, WHICH WILL BE THE REASON FOR THEIR DECISION... TAX DOLLARS, BABY... TAX DOLLARS... IT'S ALL ABOUT THE $$$$$$$$ AND NOTHING ELSE.
Harry Gio December 12, 2012 at 03:51 PM
WALMART IS A BREATH OF FRESH AIR FOR ANY COMMUNITY, BECAUSE IT CARRIES MORE THAN YOUR TYPICAL STORE AND FOR A LOT LESS MONEY.
Harry Gio December 12, 2012 at 03:54 PM
JEWEL, DOMINICK'S, ETC. THEY ARE WAY, WAY, WAY OVER-PRICED... THEY HAD THEIR CHANCE TO LOWER PRICES, BUT THE UNIONS WOULDN'T ALLOW THEM... NOW THAT YOU HAVE THE EVER-SO-LOVED WALMART COMING IN, IT'S TIME TO SAY GOODBYE TO THOSE OTHER CROOKS................
John F December 13, 2012 at 02:34 AM
What do unions have to do with allowing Jewel or Dominick's to lower prices?
Keri December 14, 2012 at 03:42 AM
Don't be bamboozled by their glitter or short sited! Don't just think about the pennies you might save! Net Net -- Walmart kills AMERICAN manufacturing jobs all across the USA -- kills small local business -- kills local retail jobs -- kills the character of the community -- kills decent wages -- kills the working class -- kills it's own worker's by not providing a livable wage or decent healthcare -- kills our social safety net by encouraging it's low paid employees to collect Food Stamps and Medicaid to the tune of 2.66 Billion of our tax dollars a year -- kills the American dream! They would outsource having their own kids if it contributed to their Holy bottom line and stock valuation. Really -- who would want or support a stinking Walmart in their backyard with all it's nasty, nasty, nasty baggage? I bet not a single elected or appointed Northbrook City government manager! (continued next post)
Keri December 14, 2012 at 03:43 AM
(continuation of Don't be bamboozled by their glitter or short sited!") If you want to live in a "community" that has to deal with a Walmart -- just move there. I am sure you can find an undervalued home nearby that would just love. You won't see the class Villages like Wilmette, Kenilworth, Winnetka, Glencoe or Lake Forest even considering letting this cesspool operation into their communities. For God sakes Northbrook -- get with it! Keep Walmart out of our nice community, which is already way over developed. Also, who is going to head-up the cause to fight this? This is important. A grassroots stand against this must not be denied. Please post. I will join the team and stand with you in a second ; ) Also, check out this one of many websites dealing with Walmart. http://walmart1percent.org/top-reasons-the-walton-family-and-walmart-are-not-job-creators/#_ftn1.
Kavan Sidhu January 16, 2013 at 08:59 AM
Walmart would be nice. Closest is golf mil and I hate driving that area. This would be much closer.
Harry Gio January 18, 2013 at 01:12 PM
What American manufacturing jobs is Walmart killing? There are NO American manufacturing jobs!
Harry Gio January 18, 2013 at 01:13 PM
Everything is manufactured overseas, which includes most parts in American automobiles too!
Harry Gio January 18, 2013 at 01:17 PM
People keep saying that we should buy American... Really? Nothing is made here anymore! 90% of General Motors, Chrysler and Ford components come from China! Regardless of what people think of Walmart, it saves people money....a lot of money!
Harry Gio January 18, 2013 at 01:21 PM
I have a little news for you, Keri, the so-called "class" Villages like Wilmette, Kenilworth, Winnetka, Glencoe or Lake Forest probably won't get a Walmart store in their town, because their residents don't mind traveling a little further to save money... ALL people want to save money, regardless of their income... PLUS, there are "undervalued" homes everywhere, expecially in areas like like Wilmette, Kenilworth, Winnetka, Glencoe and Lake Forest.
Harry Gio January 18, 2013 at 01:24 PM
Keri, I am sure you too shop at Walmart... Everyone does... Do you work for the competition ?
Keri January 18, 2013 at 03:06 PM
Harry -- you know what assuming makes you ; ) No -- I do not work for the competition or own stock in them. I am a small business owner. No -- I do not shop Walmart nor do many of my friends. We have principles that we are wiliing to stand up for and spend a few extra dollars. If you are really interested in knowing facts and not just interested in your own pocket book -- check out this and the following posts . This info comes from many many many different sources regarding Walmarts negative impact on society as a whole. Fact: Walmart is a Job Killer Walmart store openings destroy almost three local jobs for every two they create by reducing retail employment by an average of 2.7 percent in every county they enter.[1] Walmart cost America an estimated 196,000 jobs – mainly manufacturing jobs – between 2001 and 2006 as a result of the company’s imports from China.[2]
Keri January 18, 2013 at 03:10 PM
Fact: Walmart Jobs Are Poverty Jobs Walmart workers average just $8.81 hour.[3] This translates to annual pay of $15,576, based upon Walmart’s full-time status of 34 hours per week.[4] This is less than 70% of the poverty line for a family of four.[5] Walmart pays less than other retail firms. A 2005 study found that Walmart workers earn an estimated 12.4% less than retail workers as a whole, and 14.5% less than workers in large retail in general.[6] A 2007 study which compared Wal-mart to other general merchandising employers found a wage gap of 17.4%.[7] Last year, Walmart slashed already meager health benefits, leaving more workers uninsured.[8] Fact: Taxpayers Are Paying the Price for Walmart Despite all the damage they have done to US workers and communities, a 2007 study found that, as of that date, Walmart had received more than $1.2 billion in tax breaks, free land, infrastructure assistance, low-cost financing and outright grants from state and local governments around the country.[9] This number has surely increased as Walmart continues to receive additional subsidies. Taxpayers Subsidize Walmart’s Low Wages and Poor Benefits – In many states across the country, Walmart is the employer with the largest number of employees and dependents using taxpayer-funded health insurance programs.[10]
Keri January 18, 2013 at 03:11 PM
A few examples: In Arizona, according to data released by the state in 2005, the company had more 2,700 employees on the state-funded plan.[11] The company also topped the list in their home state of Arkansas, with nearly 4,000 employees forced onto the state’s plan according to data released by the state in 2005.[12] In Massachusetts, in 2009, taxpayers paid $8.8 million for Walmart associates to use publicly subsidized healthcare services.[13] Although national numbers are not available, if the cost to Massachusetts taxpayers is adjusted nationwide, the cost would be roughly $1 billion.[14]
Keri January 18, 2013 at 03:15 PM
References: [1] Neumark, David, Junfu Zhang, and Stephen Ciccarella, January 2007. “The Effects of Wal-Mart on Local Labor Markets.” Institute for the Study of Labor Discussion Paper #2545, University of Bonn. http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=958704 [2] http://www.epi.org/publication/ib235/ [3] IBIS World [4] http://walmartwatch.org/get-the-facts/fact-sheet-wages/ [5] http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/11poverty.shtml [6] Arindrajit Dube and Steve Wertheim. “Walmart and Job Quality: What Do We Know and Should We Care?” October 2005. [7] Dube, Arindrajit, T. William Lester, Barry Eidlin, 2007. A Downward Push: The Impact of Wal-Mart Stores on Retail Wages and Benefits. [8] http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7385547n&tag=mncol%3Blst%3B1 [9] http://www.walmartsubsidywatch.org/ [10] http://www.goodjobsfirst.org/corporate-subsidy-watch/hidden-taxpayer-costs [11] http://www.goodjobsfirst.org/corporate-subsidy-watch/hidden-taxpayer-costs [12] http://www.goodjobsfirst.org/corporate-subsidy-watch/hidden-taxpayer-costs [13] http://www.ufcw.org/makingchange/factsheet/index.cfm
Keri January 18, 2013 at 03:16 PM
[14] Figure is a calculation of the percentage of Massachusetts Walmart associates receiving subsidized care (42%), applied to the 1.4 million associates in the United States, at the cost to Massachusetts per each associate ($1,753.00) receiving aid. Using the data from Massachusetts for 2009 found the percentage of Associates using publicly subsidized care. Percentage is 42%. Then applied this to the entire Walmart workforce to determine number of Associates nationally who would receive publicly subsidized care using the rate in Massachusetts. From the Massachusetts data found the per Associate cost by dividing the total cost of providing subsidized care in MA to Associates by the number of MA Associates receiving subsidized care. This yielded a per Associate cost of $1,753. Multiplied that by 42% of Walmart’s total US workforce (1.4 million). Results in $1 billion.
Keri January 18, 2013 at 03:25 PM
Harry -- forgot something. I would guess that the folks in the "class" Villages like Wilmette, Kenilworth, Winnetka, Glencoe or Lake Forest also shop price shop. But they don't want a crap "Walmart" sign staring them in the face on Green Bay or Sheridan roads. That's just not too "classy" ; )

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